Category Archives: Biblical Scholars

HBU Theology Conference This Week: FREE SESSIONS

erasmus

In case you’re interested, there is a conference going on at Houston Baptist University at the end of this week commemorating the 500-year anniversary of the *first* published Greek New Testament, an event that helped fuel the Protestant Reformation. There are FOUR FREE plenary sessions, open to the public. I list them below, followed by more info on the conference. Please feel free to come, as well as to distribute this to anyone you think would be interested in attending any of the sessions. Some fine scholars will be speaking in the plenary sessions (Timothy George and Daniel Wallace, for example, as well as HBU’s own Craig Evans, and Reformation scholar Herman Selderhuis!).

Thursday, 7:30pm: Plenary Lecture 1 (Belin Chapel): Timothy George “Erasmus and the Search for the Christian Life”

Friday, 9:00-10:15am: Plenary Lecture 2 (Belin Chapel): Craig A. Evans “Erasmus and the Beginnings of Textual Fundamentalism”

Friday, 7:30pm: Plenary Lecture 3 (Belin Chapel): Daniel B. Wallace “Erasmus and the Publication of the First Greek New Testament”

Saturday, 9:00-10:15am: Plenary Lecture 4 (Belin Chapel): Herman Selderhuis “The Impact of Erasmus´ Biblical Work on the Reformation”

For more info on the conference, the schedule, and the speakers, click here.

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HBU Theology Conference

Ad Fontes, Ad Futura:
Erasmus’ Bible and the Impact of Scripture

February 25-27, 2016
Houston Baptist University

In celebration of upcoming 500th anniversary of Erasmus’ Greek text and the Reformation, the Department of Theology at HBU, in conjunction with the Dunham Bible Museum, is pleased to host the conference Ad Fontes, Ad Futura: Erasmus’ Bible and the Impact of Scripture. The conference will consider the textual and historical issues surrounding the development of the Bible, the Bible’s impact on human society across the centuries, and the future of Biblical translation and interpretation in the future. Our keynote speakers include Craig Evans (Houston Baptist University), Timothy George (Beeson Divinity School, Samford University), Herman Selderhuis (Theological University Apeldoorn) and Daniel B. Wallace (Dallas Theological Seminary). The plenary talks are free and open to the public.

Registration
The conference will be held at Houston Baptist University, Houston, TX. The conference fee is $40, which includes refreshments and coffee. Accommodations and meals are not included in the conference fee.

If you are affiliated with HBU (faculty, staff, or student), admission to the conference is free. To register please send an email from your HBU account to theology@hbu.edu, giving your name as you want it on your nametag.

Register and pay online now.

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OT Scholar Ronald F. Youngblood dies at age of 82

I’ve been tied up with enough things over the past few weeks to manage to have missed this news until today. On July 5, 2014, Dr. Ronald Youngblood passed into glory. He taught Old Testament/Hebrew for Bethel Seminary at both the Saint Paul, MN and the San Diego, CA campuses (retiring from the latter in 2001). A fine gentleman and faithful, godly biblical scholar, he will be missed. Here are links to some of the sites reflecting on his life and service.

http://www.koinoniablog.net/2014/07/remembering-ronald-f-youngblood.html

http://www.biblica.com/en-us/about-us/news/2014/remembering-ron-youngblood/

https://www.biblegateway.com/blog/2014/07/the-legacy-of-ron-youngblood/

http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2014/Jul/19/ronald-youngblood-translation-bible/

 

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Tom Schreiner in Houston Fri-Sun March 28-30

Come hear Dr. Tom Schreiner at Founders Baptist in Spring, TX this Fri/Sat/Sun! FREE Spurgeon Conference.

DATE & TIME

  • March 28, 2014 / 7:00pm
  • March 29, 2014 / 7:00pm
  • March 30, 2014 / 10:30am & 6:30pm
  • Topic: The Upside Down Kingdom
  • Guest Speaker: Dr. Tom Schreiner

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In Memoriam: Prof. Anson Rainey (1930-2011)

I just received word today that the long and illustrious career of Anson Rainey ended yesterday when he lost his battle with pancreatic cancer. If you’d like to see the scholarly achievements of a bright light in studies of ANE language and culture, click here. It appears that the list of published works was last updated around 2008, so it is incomplete. But at last count, he had authored/edited 9 books, 112 articles in scholarly journals, and 48 essays which were components of books.

I’ve recently been listening to St. Augustine’s Confessions, and I came across this gem that I didn’t remember when I read the book in college: “And this idea sprang up in my mind out of my inmost heart, and I wrote some books–two or three, I think–On the Beautiful and the Fitting. Thou knowest them, O Lord; they have escaped my memory. I no longer have them; somehow they have been mislaid.” I’m tickled to imagine that someone could have written a few books and forgotten them or misplaced them! The only type of person who can even remotely begin to empathize with Augustine is one who is incredibly prolific–and Prof. Rainey was certainly that! I wonder how many books Prof. Rainey wrote and never published. . . . May God rest his soul.

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Dr. Robert Holmstedt on Writing Book Reviews

Robert Holmstedt of the University of Toronto recently posted a piece over at Ancient Hebrew Grammar on the function of book reviews, in light of a few negative reviews of his book Ruth: A Handbook on the Hebrew Text.  He makes some great comments on what a review should aim for, especially how reviews ought to assess the success of any work based on the author’s purpose (and the series’ purpose, if it is a volume in a series).  I recommend that all my students take a look at what Holmstedt has to say on this.

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The Homegoing of OT Scholar D.J. Wiseman

This past week I received a news letter from Pete Williams of Tyndale House notifying that Donald Wiseman had passed away.  Below I am pasting a tribute to Dr. Wiseman written by Professor Alan Millard (Univ. of Liverpool), which Pete had sent along.  I’m very thankful for the way in which Wiseman united a lively faith with his sharp intellect.  May his tribe increase!

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Professor Donald Wiseman (1918-2010)
The passing of Donald Wiseman on 2nd February, 2010, marks the end of an era in the story of Tyndale House and the Tyndale Fellowship. After a year reading history at King’s College, London, W. J. Martin persuaded him that study of the biblical world and its languages would be more valuable to the church and biblical studies, so he turned to Hebrew and Assyriology. Martin had been the major stimulus in the creation of Tyndale House and Donald Wiseman saw its strategic potential. He gave much time and thought to the affairs of the House, serving as Chairman of the Biblical Research Committee, which had the initial responsibility and of the Tyndale House Council, which inherited it, from 1957 to 1986. As Chairman of that and other committees, he guided discussion with wisdom, patience and humour, ensuring sensible decisions were made. When there were doubts in UCCF (then IVF) circles about continuing financial support, he insisted that the House was providing a service which no other evangelical institution offered and had potential for much more. When problems of space for the Library arose, it was Donald who suggested the annexe which was built as The Hexagon in 1984.

He saw the priority for Tyndale House lay in biblical research, supplying positive information and arguments to oppose widely taught liberal views about Scripture. His vision was well expressed by John Stott in 1992, ‘We shall never capture the church for the truth of the gospel unless and until we can re-establish biblical scholarship, hold (and not lose) the best theological minds in every generation, and overthrow the enemies of the gospel by confronting them at their own level of scholarship’ (Quoted by Tom Noble, Tyndale House and Fellowship, 239).

Like Martin, Donald Wiseman was a great enthusiast and encourager of others, in Britain and abroad. He chaired the Tyndale Old Testament Study Group from 1951 to 1981, taking time and trouble to find young scholars whom he could introduce to the Group so that they would know there were others who could support them in their often lonely  research. The Bible is a product of the ancient Near East, so he recognized that it should be read and assessed in the light of knowledge about that world. With that in mind, aware of the value of the archaeological contexts of ancient artefacts, he set up the Tyndale Biblical Archaeology Study Group in 1958, which, although not functioning regularly in recent years, brought together linguists and archaeologists to evaluate and apply new and old discoveries to biblical studies. On his initiative papers were brought together as Notes on Some Problems in the Book of Daniel (1965) and Essays on the Patriarchal Narratives (1980) and he stimulated other publications by fellows of Tyndale House (e.g. David Tsumura, The Earth and the Waters in Genesis 1 and 2, 1989). A volume of  essays by members of the Old Testament Study Group was dedicated to him in gratitude for his many years of devotion (R. S. Hess, G. J. Wenham. P. Satterthwaite, eds., He Swore an Oath (1994).

His experience and knowledge marked Donald as a major contributor to, and Editor of, the New Bible Dictionary (1962, 1982, 1996) and The Illustrated Bible Dictionary (1980). For many years he was Editor for Tyndale Old Testament Commentaries and gave his skills to a variety of other Christian publications.

Donald was always ready to help a cause he thought would be fruitful in the service of his Saviour, preaching and teaching and holding informal groups for Bible Study. The number who faced the claims of the Gospel through meeting him cannot be told, neither can the number whose lives and careers he has influenced or guided.
As one of the latter, I give thanks for his life, his service and his fellowship.

Alan Millard

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