Tag Archives: Linguistics

Linguistics and the Greek Verb Conference Announcement!

Looks like a wonderful conference. Hats off to Chris Fresch for helping to get something like this rolling, along with a tremendous cast of characters (yes, *characters*!). Wish I could be there. Maybe Mike Aubrey can go and live-blog every phoneme for us! 🙂

Old School Script

Posted by Chris with a “C”

I am very excited to announce “Linguistics and the Greek Verb: Recent Discussions and their Implications for NT Exegetes” — a Greek linguistics conference taking place in Cambridge, England, this July!

Linguistics and the Greek Verb Flier pic

The aim of the conference is to bring together NT scholars, linguists, and Classicists to discuss the Greek verbal system in a way that is clear and that moves the conversation forward while acknowledging and respecting the discussions of the past three decades within Biblical Studies. (If you would like to read the backstory of this conference, see my post “How We Got to Where We’re Going: A Story.”) I am incredibly excited about this conference. Not only will we have some phenomenal speakers from within the Biblical Studies guild, but we will also have the benefit of learning from Classicists, voices often not heard in Biblical Studies.

The conference is an…

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Language Log » François Mitterrand crash blossom

From Language Log:  Here’s an example of why it’s important to understand the basics of syntax, structural ambiguity, and proper punctuation.  The first line of the New York Times piece has seemingly added to Mitterrand’s sins! Interesting commentary at the Language Log link’s combox.  –psm

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“François Mitterrand crash blossom”

Under the heading “the benefits of paired em dashes, part 57″, Mark Swofford sent in the following screen shot from yesterday’s New York Times:

The main part of the caption under the most prominent photo in the screen shot reads:

“Mazarine Pingeot, the daughter of François Mitterrand, the former French president, and his longtime mistress, has published a diary.”

As Mark says, “It took me several readings before that stopped sounding incestuous.”

December 2, 2012 @ 11:09 pm · Filed by Victor Mair under Crash blossoms, Punctuation

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via Language Log » François Mitterrand crash blossom.

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Here’s a piece that I just posted on our School of Christian Thought website at Houston Baptist University. I explore briefly what linguistics is, and why it is beneficial to study linguistics.

School of Christian Thought

Here at HBU we have a Biblical Languages program, which includes both an undergraduate degree in biblical languages (just Greek and Hebrew) and an MA in biblical languages (Greek, Hebrew, and Aramaic).  One of the requirements that we insist on for both programs is a course in General Linguistics.  As the Director of the MABL program, sometimes I am asked questions like What is linguistics? and Why is it important to study linguistics?  In this post I will attempt to provide some brief answers to those questions.

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Fun With Linguistics: Productivity

In linguistics we have a term for how you can use patterns to create new words: productivity. For example, the -ly suffix can be added to many adjectives to create new adverbs: “nice” becomes “nicely” while “able” becomes “ably.” That’s a productive pattern. What’s amazing is that children who are learning to speak a language natively start using such productive patterns intuitively, without ever being told explicitly how to do it. And they are correct most of the time. But when they misapply a productive pattern, it’s often funny. Tonight, I heard another funny. This evening Andrew and Kathryn (our 7 year old twins) decided they would sleep under a make-shift tent created by draping bed sheets over chairs and stools. As I was helping them lay down their make-shift beds, Andrew determined that he would use a huge beach towel as his “blanket.” Kathryn objected, misapplying a productive word-formation pattern:

“But . . . that’s not . . . blanketable.”

I’m still smiling. 🙂

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