OT Scholar Ronald F. Youngblood dies at age of 82

I’ve been tied up with enough things over the past few weeks to manage to have missed this news until today. On July 5, 2014, Dr. Ronald Youngblood passed into glory. He taught Old Testament/Hebrew for Bethel Seminary at both the Saint Paul, MN and the San Diego, CA campuses (retiring from the latter in 2001). A fine gentleman and faithful, godly biblical scholar, he will be missed. Here are links to some of the sites reflecting on his life and service.

http://www.koinoniablog.net/2014/07/remembering-ronald-f-youngblood.html

http://www.biblica.com/en-us/about-us/news/2014/remembering-ron-youngblood/

https://www.biblegateway.com/blog/2014/07/the-legacy-of-ron-youngblood/

http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2014/Jul/19/ronald-youngblood-translation-bible/

 

Wanna’ Study Biblical Greek This Summer at Southwestern Seminary in Houston?

ANNOUNCEMENT:  I’m teaching Turbo Greek at Southwestern Seminary-Houston starting Tuesday, May 13 .  We will cover a full year of Biblical Greek in 10 wks.  The Greek course meets Tuesdays/Fridays from 8am to noon. In order for the course to make we need enough people committed by the end of the day tomorrow–Friday, May 9.  Please email me (psmarshall AT gmail DOT com) if you need details and I’ll get you set up.

Also, you could contact the following about enrolling ASAP:

Hudson Hanks (hhanks@swbts.edu)
Director of Business & Student Services
713.634.0011 ext. 222

Please spread the word if you know anyone who is interested!

Tom Schreiner in Houston Fri-Sun March 28-30

Come hear Dr. Tom Schreiner at Founders Baptist in Spring, TX this Fri/Sat/Sun! FREE Spurgeon Conference.

DATE & TIME

  • March 28, 2014 / 7:00pm
  • March 29, 2014 / 7:00pm
  • March 30, 2014 / 10:30am & 6:30pm
  • Topic: The Upside Down Kingdom
  • Guest Speaker: Dr. Tom Schreiner

Spurgeon page header

Hebrew Humor for the Holiday (that’s Spring Break for non-UK folks)

I cannot take credit for the following; my MA student (at HBU) ImageBenjamin Summers forwarded these to me months ago. But they *are* enjoyable.

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Q: Why don’t Bible translators ever buy matte paint?

A: Because they’re always looking for a good gloss.

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Q: Which Hebrew letter is nothing to sneeze at?

A: Allergic nun.

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Q: Which Old Testament authors found the most gems and nuggets of wisdom?

A: The miner prophets.

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Q: What kind of machine would Siskel & Ebert use to determine whether a film gets a thumbs-up or a thumbs-down?

A: Their critical apparatus.

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Q: What story did the Hebrew professor tell around the campfire?

A: The tale of the headless relative clause.

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Q: What flavor gum does a rabbi chew?

A: Tar gum.

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Q: How is an exegete different from a submarine captain?

A: One searches through a periscope while the other searches through a pericope.

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Q: If you don’t practice using a lexicon, why will your translation stink?

A: Because not brushing up gives you HALOT-osis.

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Q: The sentence topic that was just here – where did it go?

A: It left dislocation.

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Q: Why couldn’t the overly humble student tell a direct object from an adjunct prepositional phrase?

A: He just didn’t know how to take a complement.

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Q: What moral lesson can we learn from identifying verbless clauses?

A: What’s right isn’t always copular, and what’s copular isn’t always right.

Hebrew: the EASY language?

Just posted this today at the HBU School of Christian Thought blog. Reblogging for those who don’t catch the SCT site regularly.

School of Christian Thought

Hebrew

One of our MA in Biblical Languages students did an undergrad degree in French at the University of Oklahoma.  While on a brief visit to his old alma mater recently, he snapped this picture of one of the bulletin boards in the language department. Especially intriguing is the green flyer. So . . . Hebrew is a fun, EASY language! Who knew?

Of course, my students who are in the middle of learning first-year Hebrew don’t think it’s easy (although I have heard from a number of them that they do think it’s fun).  How easy is Hebrew compared to, say, Greek? Hebrew is simpler than Greek in a number of ways, and often simpler is easier. So here are a few tidbits for the interested reader. In my Koine Greek class, we learn 24 forms of the definite article (the). In Hebrew, we learn one basic form…

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Wait, I Thought N.T. Wright Said That First?

Nice illustration from Derek Rishmawy about how good modern insights on the text have often already found their way into the life of the Church. Calvin is still insightful, after 500 years.

Reformedish

New Creation WrightOne of my favorite things about reading the Reformers, or the Fathers for that matter, is finding that the best insights I’ve loved in modern scholars aren’t really that new at all. Take the concept of ‘new creation.’ For many of us, N.T. Wright is probably the modern scholar who brought our attention to the theology of new creation. At least for me he did. In his many works on Paul, the Resurrection, and Christian Origins, again and again, he calls us to hear the proclamation that in Christ’s life, death, and resurrection all things, the cosmos as a whole, have been renewed. God wasn’t simply concerned with saving souls off to an ethereal heaven, but rather faithfully rescuing the world from the decay into which it had fallen. Resurrection isn’t just for people, but the universe as a whole. This is bracing and beautifully good news.

As great as learning…

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Sermon on John 19:28-37 “Jesus, A Thirsty Savior for Thirsty Sinners”

Back several months ago I preached a sermon at Magnolia Creek Baptist Church for my friend and colleague, Pastor Brett Dutton.  I’ve just now figured out how to save the audio file so that I can re-post it here (yes, sometimes I’m technologically challenged).  If you’re so inclined, feel free to have a listen and/or pass it along to those you think it will encourage.  Please be aware that the introductory voice on the mp3 bumper says that “Brett Dutton” will be preaching, but it really is me! 🙂

Click here to listen to “Jesus, A Thirsty Savior for Thirsty Sinners”

Summer Biblical Hebrew and Greek at Southwestern Seminary in Houston

ANNOUNCEMENT:  I’m teaching Turbo Hebrew and Turbo Greek at Southwestern Seminary-Houston starting Monday, May 13 (Hebrew starts May 13; Greek May 14).  We will cover a full year of Biblical Hebrew or Biblical Greek in 10 wks.  The Hebrew course meets Mondays/Thursdays from 8am to noon each time; the Greek course meets Tuesdays/Fridays from 8am to noon. In order for the course to make we need enough people committed by the end of the day tomorrow–Tuesday, May 7.  Please email me (psmarshall AT gmail DOT com) if you need details and I’ll get you set up.

Also, you could contact the following about enrolling ASAP:

Hudson Hanks (hhanks@swbts.edu)
Director of Business & Student Services
713.634.0011 ext. 222

Please spread the word if you know anyone who is interested!

Re-Blog: Psalm 121: God Our Helper and Keeper

Just posted this link to my recent message on Psalm 121 to our HBU School of Christian Thought blog. Hope it gives encouragement to someone out there!

School of Christian Thought

Earlier this month I delivered a message at Bethel Bible Fellowship on Psalm 121. In it, I explored the universality of the human condition as one of neediness:

“Let’s not fool ourselves: we are indeed needy people, when we find ourselves there at that point of deep need, we will seek help from somewhere.  The question that confronts us today is, ‘Where do you seek your ultimate source of help in this broken, sinful world?’  When the chips are down, where do you lean the hardest? Fundamentally–there are only two answers to the question, ‘Where do you seek help, ultimately?’: Either in [a] Human Resources (myself, family, merely human wisdom, technology and civilization, education, self-help books, etc.), OR in [b] Divine Resources (God: God’s wisdom, God’s power, God’s perspective, God’s instructions, God’s promises, God’s plans).”

In the message, I expound the Psalmist’s motivations for us to look to God as…

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Promoting the study of Biblical Hebrew, Biblical Aramaic, and Hellenistic Greek